Tag Archives: programmatic

The New Digital Advertising Ecosystem Part 7: Programmatic Direct and Private Marketplaces

Private Marketplaces, also known as PMPs, are places where publishers offer their ad inventory to a selected group of advertisers. You may also hear buying in Private Marketplaces referred to as:

  • Programmatic Premium
  • Programmatic Direct
  • Programmatic Guaranteed
  • Programmatic Reserved
  • Preferred Deals
  • Private Auctions

Don’t worry, these are all basically the same thing – just different flavours of PMP.

Programmatic Direct combines the best of direct sales with the targeting and automation benefits of programmatic. PMPs are now a popular method of programmatic trading.

For publishers, PMPs give tighter control on which kinds of advertisers and creatives will be displayed on their site or app, while not having to manage individual advertisers like they would in a direct buy.

For buyers, PMPs allow access to premium quality inventory, and all the bespoke benefits of working directly with a seller – but also allow use of data, targeting and reporting from a single DSP dashboard.

Typically CPMs are higher in a PMP because premium advertisers are competing for the highest quality ad inventory on very reputable digital properties.

Each type of PMP does a specific job for buyers or sellers.

programmatic-as-a-means-to-meeting-your-marketing-goals-by-darragh-daunt-incisive-create-ad-effectiveness-16-638

This is a great video from sovrn that covers RTB v PMPs and Programmatic Direct in a little more detail.

Make sure you read the earlier articles in this series to understand basic concepts of programmatic.

WPP Stream Top 100 Tech Conferences 2016

Handy Google spreadsheet listing out the Top 100 tech conferences recommended by WPP for 2016.

Not many Asia focused events, only World Cities Summit 2016 and Code Conference Asia covered.

We think ATS Singapore deserves a mention for those wanting to find out more about programmatic, and Tech in Asia run a comprehensive calendar of start up and tech events across APAC on their site which is worth checking out.

The New Digital Advertising Ecosystem Part VI: Agency Trading Desks

In the latest in our series on programmatic we take a look at Agency Trading Desks (ATDs), the independent units within media agencies that specialise in programmatic buying. In Asia we often hear ATDs referred to as Internal Ad Networks, or just as “the Programmatic team”.

Agency Trading Desks have been set up by the large agency groups to support their clients who want to buy programmatically.

Examples include Xaxis, Accuen and Vivaki. See the Holding Company, Agency and Trading desk mapping below to understand how it all fits together.

Map of Agencies and Trading Desks [PDF]

Download here.

Agency Trading Desks usually offer a transparent and data driven approach to media buying, certainly compared to standard digital media, and can deliver impressive ROIs for smart marketers. ATDs use Demand Side Platforms (DSPs) to buy their media, and utilise a combination of Real Time Buying (RTB) and direct publisher deals to get the best results. Targeting is delivered via a Data Management Platform (DMP).

We know. Too many acronyms.

In summary, programmatic is a much smarter way of buying media and SHOULD get you better results.

But it can be confusing. Agency Trading Desks do a great job of simplifying this complex world.

In addition to being the future of media, programmatic is also a major revenue growth engine for agencies, who have seen profits reduced over the past 20 years by (sometimes over zealous) client procurement teams.

Establishing ATDs as a specialist unit enables agencies to charge fees for the additional services provided, including technology, data, and bespoke media. This is good or bad for the client depending on who you listen to.

What is for certain is that programmatic is moving at high speed and Agency Trading Desks are still evolving. Some ATDs will disappear and become part of the agency, while others will remain as specialist technology units.

In Asia, programmatic is just getting started and we still haven’t seen a full roll out of ATDs beyond regional level in Singapore. Watch this space.

We should also note that there are a bunch of other trading desks operating independently across Asia outside the big agency groups including Performance Asia and CTRL/SHIFT alongside many more.

The 70/20/10 Rule for Marketing Innovation

Too often people see innovation as a flash of lightning, striking at random. And too many businesses are afraid to try new things, creating a huge barrier to success.

Clearly inspiration is core to innovation, and new things are scary. But, as strange as it might sound, you can actually plan to be innovative – and protect your marketing investment – with a very simple strategy.

It’s called the 70/20/10 Rule, and it will help you map out all the things you could do with your marketing, into a structured approach that will help drive your business forward.

So how does it work? First, take your Digital marketing budget and divide it into three buckets: one with 70% of the money and two others with 20% and 10%, respectively.

70%: NOW

Your largest investment should be in established marketing programs. Focus on refining activity you have run for several years with a record of success. Right now this is likely to include Google Search, Desktop Display, and Facebook activity – although it depends where you are in your Digital marketing journey. It’s crucial to maintain a strong base to protect your success.

20%: NEW

The next 20% of your budget should go on emerging areas that are starting to gain traction. This is about generating safe learning opportunities. Mobile and Programmatic are hot right now for most marketers, but it should also be about trying new suppliers for activity you are already doing well at. Not every test will work out, but the ones that do will set up your future plans and keep you ahead of the competition.

10%: NEXT

You can think of this final 10% as your marketing insurance. Set the stage for the future by investing in areas you have never tested before. Start small and scale fast. Remember these 10% tests will one day be your 70%. And without investing here you will very quickly fall behind your competition.

Even gigantic global brands such as Coca Cola follow this approach. Wendy Clark, SVP, Marketing for Coca-Cola, gave the below presentation at a McKinsey CMO event recently. She explained how, to be successful today, companies need to employ a test and learn approach. At Coke, 70% of spend funds current proven programs, 20% goes to new and promising trends, and 10% to test completely new ideas.

What’s important in all this is that innovation can have a process. With the 70/20/10 approach it’s easy to protect your success NOW, while finding the NEW and NEXT things you need to stay ahead.

 

The New Digital Advertising Ecosystem Part V: Programmatic goes Global

The programmatic revolution knows no borders. The same transformation that North American and European ad markets have seen recently is now showing up in markets around the world – including Asia – as global marketers embrace programmatic. In fact 55% of brands and agencies already have a global programmatic strategy in place according to recent studies.

The drivers for the broad adoption of programmatic are simple to understand, and similar globally. Brands and agencies use programmatic to increase marketing efficiency, helping them get more out of their budgets.

In the latest in our series covering the new Digital advertising ecosystem we look at best practices and emerging trends as programmatic goes global in Advertising Age’s Global Programmatic Survey, conducted for DataXu.

Mobile Viewability: The final frontier

Mobile is a hot topic. Viewability is perhaps even hotter. Bring the two together and you have some sort of digital marketing nuclear volcano.

Well maybe. Mobile viewability is a subset of the overall “has my ad been seen and by who” issue, but a particularly tricky one. The lack of a unique user ID is the clearest roadblock. But it’s also clear that the various technologies and vendors used to solve mobile advertising delivery issues, often create further fragmentation.

Fragmentation is especially critical when understanding exactly how ads are delivered to a mobile webpage or app. In mere milliseconds – the time it takes to load a webpage or app – a typical mobile ad is requested, analyzed, bid on, approved, and served. That’s the reality of the coming era of programmatic advertising as many of you know.

A recent infographic from The Mobile Majority walks us through the steps required for all these technologies to work together. And with a whole swathe of brands and ad tech firms in the mobile first APAC region committing unequivocally to the future of programmatic, the mobile viewability issue is not going to go away.

Understanding Mobile Viewability [2015]

Mobile-Viewability-The-Mobile-Majority

In simple terms, the entire journey of an ad, from initial request to final display, has to happen really fast. That’s what programmatic necessitates. During such a rapid journey, handoffs between technologies and vendors have to be clean and consistent.

Once the ad is actually placed, a whole other set of considerations emerge. Publishers control their site or app, deciding how and where to place the ads that get delivered. On the other hand, tech vendors control how the ad is rendered. How that rendering interacts with publisher placement can go a long way in determining viewability.

Mobile ads are also becoming more complex. The banner ad, although still incredibly popular, is receding to the back of the most-effective-ad discussion. Taking its place at the front are rich media ads and video, which offer much higher levels of interactivity, engagement and ultimately conversion.

But higher levels of creative require – you guessed it – more layers of technology. Try to integrate this creative across different operating systems, app formats, web browsers and connection types, and you have countless opportunities for viewability to break down.

And here’s the final problem: we don’t even have a set of viewability standards for mobile yet. The IAB standards are designed for desktop, and therefore really only helpful as a frame of reference. So while we wait for official mobile guidelines (expected by the end of this year), viewability on mobile will continue to have a frontier feel to it. Hopefully, there won’t be too many outlaws.

Data and Automation will Drive Programmatic in APAC

Programmatic advertising seems to be taking over the world in 2015, and it’s importance is growing across Asian markets.

Matt-Ware_avatar_1428590011-300x300In fact recent studies show that 3 out of 4 APAC brands to increase investment in data driven buying over the year ahead, in line with global trends.

We talk to Matt Ware, Commercial Director APAC, at MediaMath about the three M’s – Mad Men, Math Men, and Maroon 5. Plus a little bit about programmatic.

DIA Hi Matt. How are you?

MW Hi Digital in Asia! Very well thanks.

DIA We’re big fans of Mad Men here at DIA. Can you explain how we got from the Mad Men era, to the Math Men era, and the key differences?

MW To the world’s first advertising agencies, the technology now available to help marketers would have seemed like something from a fantastical science fiction novel.

In reality, the latest technology is proving to be an essential business tool in delivering what has long been promised but never realised – true customer-centric marketing.

While these tools and new ways of working can seem complex and intimidating even to experienced agency hands and marketers, grasping the fundamentals and understanding how programmatic can help business is surprisingly simple.

DIA What are the most compelling benefits programmatic trading can offer advertisers?

MW The three key business advantages that programmatic can deliver are improved targeting, scale, and relevancy. Combining these elements with real-time decision-making across millions of ad-serving opportunities means a brand can lower its marketing costs while boosting its return on investment.

At the heart of the matter is data. Consumers are becoming more sophisticated in how they use devices – from desktops to tablets and mobiles – and when they want to research, review, and buy goods or services. Marketers can now access more data than ever before about this increasingly complicated consumer path to purchase.

DIA Tell us more about data driven advertising. We know that data is THE key component of marketing moving forward.

MW Data Driven Marketing and Advertising (DDMA) – a common acronym among agencies and networks – is powered by technology that analyses vast data sets and provides the algorithms that underpin programmatic buying. This approach to marketing strategy is attracting more and more investment.

According to research conducted among 3,000 marketing practitioners across 17 countries, almost two-thirds (63%) increased their investment in DDMA in 2014, and nearly three-quarters (73%) expect to increase their DDMA budget this year.

It is vital that companies invest in technology that can analyse their consumer data because without this information, their competitors will simply leave them behind. The technology enables data to be qualified and mined for insights that can help with audience segmentation and contextual targeting. Engaging ads can then be created to serve to potential customers. Finally, these ads must be tracked, measured, adjusted and tested again and again to achieve optimum performance.

DIA How can advertisers take their first steps into programmatic?

MW Many brands are now testing programmatic buying on small projects so they can learn more about the systems, before using the results to help convince the CEO or the board that more budget should be invested in automated trading. Some brands such as Mondelez and Procter & Gamble have already announced that a large chunk of media spend will now be traded programmatically.

DIA What does programmatic advertising mean for consumers?

MW Ultimately, programmatic trading allows clients to serve relevant advertising to the consumer via the appropriate channel or platform, and at the right time. It is customer-centric because it prevents the shopper from being bombarded with meaningless messages for products in which they have no interest. The idea is to create a truly personalised shopping experience.

The brand, client, and agency benefit from efficiencies of scale and accurate targeting, and there is less money wasted on trying to reach the potential consumer. A consumer who is happy with the messages he or she receives is more likely to buy the goods and services on offer. It’s a win-win all round.

DIA Thanks Matt. Finally, has anyone ever mentioned your resemblance to Maroon 5 lead singer Adam Levine?!

MW Thank you. The rock and roll stardom wasn’t enough for me, I find a career in programmatic far more exciting.

APAC, the $6bn Mobile gaming opportunity

With close to $6 billion revenue, Asia Pacific is the largest mobile gaming market in the world. Led by Japan, China and South Korea, the category is still growing at 25% annually across the region.

We chat to Jun Lim, Senior Business Development Manager and Lison Chen, Senior Account Manager at AppLift about this promising yet “very fragmented” market opportunity.

DIA: What are the biggest challenges for mobile game advertising in Asia?

JL & LC: The Asian market is very fragmented. Each market is different in terms of language, culture, and economic levels. Advertisers in different markets have different levels of understanding regarding the business model and traffic sources of mobile advertising, and traffic is still centralized by either big international players such as Facebook, Google, and Inmobi or local players such as Wechat in China, KakaoTalk in Korea, and Line in Japan. It is important to understand the situation and preferences in each country, and have a localized strategy to better satisfy the advertisers’ needs and wants.

What are the key opportunities?

The Asian market is still growing. Due to the rise of smartphone penetration and shipments, especially in Thailand, Vietnam, and Malaysia, we continue to see rapidly growing markets in South East Asia. Mid-mature markets such as Korea, Japan, and China are the top countries in terms of revenue in Google Play and App Stores. Mobile marketing trend is changing rapidly into performance-driven, meaning that it is possible to do campaign with measurable numbers.

How is AppLift positioning itself in the region? Which markets have the strongest potential?

AppLift positions itself as a data-driven app marketing platform that helps advertisers to handle the full spectrum of user acquisition. Additionally, AppLift highlights its LTV optimization technology that enables quality user acquisition on a performance basis. For example, in Korea, AppLift ran a non-incentive marketing campaign for RealFarm, a mobile farming game from NeoGames that delivered real vegetables to a few users who reached a certain level. AppLift focused on this interesting aspect of the game, and few months after the campaign, the fact that the game delivers real veggies went on viral through AppLift’s various media partners, resulting in a ROI of 1200%. It was a result of both NeoGames’ well-developed game contents and AppLift’s marketing strategy.

Do you see clients using mobile for brand driven campaigns? How do you position the connection between mobile and other media?

Branding can definitely help to increase the performances of mobile game advertising. Supercell, for example, spent millions of dollars on branded advertising for its game Clash of Clans across multiple channels such as metro, OOH and TV in Korea. Supercell’s massive promotion earned the game the number 1 position in the gross chart on Korea’s Google play even without using [the mobile platform] KakaoTalk. After the success of CoC, it has become quite a norm in Korea to do a huge scale branding / offline campaigns as in the case of mobile games such as Summoners War and Line Rangers. Mobile is such an real time channel in this sense, and brands are really getting to grips with the connection to other media.

Mobile ads have a reputation for low – or at least hard to track – performance. How does AppLift overcome this? Is data a big part of your positioning?

Based on big data, AppLift’s programmatic buying algorithm can target only the relevant audiences and content for a certain game. It can optimize campaigns and target performance improvements against CTR or revenue. These data driven techniques are very standard to advertising globally, and it is great to bring them at scale to APAC markets.

What is AppLift’s strategy to take on the APAC market?

With advanced technologies and know-how in each Asian market, AppLift plans to provide one-stop advertising/user acquisition services to advertisers. Our goal is to help advertisers connect their games/apps to the targeted Asian markets effectively through our technology, data and services.

What is your advice for brand marketers in one sentence?

Asian markets are sexy but challenging. Brand marketers should prepare various advertising strategies to adapt to local markets.

Thank you.

Kenshoo launches new product suite targeting mobile advertising market

Kenshoo today announced the release of Kenshoo Infinity Suite, aimed at the mobile display advertising market, expected to be a growth area over 2015 in APAC. The new product connects to ad tech giant AppNexus, meaning clients can now activate search and social data across display and rapidly growing in-app placements on exchanges like MoPub, Nexage, and other select inventory sources. Continue reading Kenshoo launches new product suite targeting mobile advertising market